Tag Archives: Dan Ingram

‘Hey Kemosabe’ Brings Front-Row Seat for Musicradio WABC Era

KemosabeIt was a magical time in New York radio. Musicradio 77 WABC was the center of the universe for any Top 40 fan. But 77 was also the hottest spot on the dial for the country’s most acclaimed jocks.

Chris Ingram has placed us in the middle of that frenetic era. His new book, Hey Kemosabe! The Days (and Nights) of a Radio Idyll (Dog Ear Publishing) gives readers an equally fast-paced look at some key moments. (And I’m not just saying that because of my gig as 77 WABC street reporter!)

Yes, Ingram has some familiarity on the subject. His dad (who recently turned 80) is Dan Ingram. He is so revered for his radio work, specifically the more than two decades as afternoon DJ at WABC. Ingram is usually on the short list of greatest Top 40 jocks of all-time, and regarded by many as the best.

The junior Ingram does point out in the foreword that the book is “not a biography, nor is it a history book.”

But if you were expecting “the names have been changed to protect the innocent,” think again. They’re all here: Ingram, Cousin Brucie, Ron Lundy, Chuck Leonard, and Rick Sklar.

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History of New York City Radio Comes Alive in New Photo Book

NYC RadioBy JERRY BARMASH
(@jerrybarmash)

Authors Alec Cumming and Peter Kanze have unearthed many rare photos of the Radio New York style. The new book, Images of America: New York City Radio by Arcadia Publishing, takes readers from a 1909 wireless telephone display to present day WAXQ/Q 104.3 with a shot of longstanding personalities, Jim Kerr, Carol Miller, and Shelli Sonstein.

In between, there are dozens of images from the last century, when radio was king.

While the paperback is only 126 pages and there is no actual text, just an extended caption for each picture.

Many on-air folks and stations are represented, some more than once, but others are oddly missed. For example, there are no photos of WFAN, New York and the country’s first all-sports station, which celebrated 25 years on the air in 2012. But the title doesn’t include the words “comprehensive history.”

However, the book does have some vintage pictures, including a look at the beginnings of WOR in the early 1920s when it started as a radio station for Bamberger’s department store.

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